War has been called a race to make things. Maximizing production became all important...

Production...

Production...

In order to maximize production, not only must an enthusiastic workforce be recruited, but raw materials must also be made available. Raw materials such as lumber and copper were produced de novo.

But de novo production of raw materials was only one aspect. The recycling of existing materials already incorporated into products boosted raw material production. Civilians were encouraged to recycle products that contained needed raw materials such as tin...

silk...

rope...

gasoline...

steel...

America's sources of rubber were under seige by the Japanese in the South Pacific. Rubber became an all important resource to be conserved. Scrap drives were held...

And Americans were told to carpool...

and to slow down...

Food is also vital to fighting strength. Not surprisingly, it was rationed...

preserved...

and conserved...

Civilians were encouraged to grow their own food so that more could be made available to forces overseas. These civilian gardens were called victory gardens...

The civilian workforce steadily increased and raw materials were gathered at a fast and furious pace. But this production was not free. War financing became a major issue. Once again the civilians were mobilized. War bond drives abounded...

The government wanted all citizens to use 10% of every paycheck to buy war bonds and stamps...

Yes, even prostitutes...

So Americans bought bonds...

And stamps...

And production rolled on. The architects of war knew that an adequate workforce, ample raw materials and money was not enough to maximize production. Maintaining civilian morale was crucial. This was the only way an extended conflict could be sustained. And who knew how long it would take to win a two front war. The work force needed to be well rested...

careful to minimize errors...

proud of their work...

motivated...

informed...

healthy...

and they needed to be there...

When away from work, recreation was necessary to provide needed release. Night clubs were an important and inexpensive activity...

as was Baseball...

Bowling...

and as always, music...

Civilians were taught to hate the axis leaders...

hitler, mussolini and tojo were portrayed as vile creatures. Snakes, vultures, skunks and rats...

And citizens were able to vent on axis leaders...

And vent...

The American homefront was saturated with images of the enemy. There was no mystery as to whom they were nor what fate awaited them...

American civilians were programmed to hate the enemy. What remained was motivating the homefront for final victory no matter how prolonged the fight. The slogan "V for Victory" permeated the homefront. It served to cement the mindset that victory was not a question of if but a question of when. It was ubiquitous. On letters...

Cars...

in windows...

magazines...

household items...

toys...

and even music...

Civilians worked and worked, maximizing production and turning out the necessary materiel while soldiers fought far away on two fronts. Just how prolonged could the conflict be ? It has been said that the final stage of any mobilization is the seedcorn; the children. hitler embraced this and formed the hitler youth. He realized that this would create a generation of citizens loyal to him. While more subtle, the same mobilization occurred on the U.S. homefront. Children's books taught good ideology versus bad ideology...

Toys developed hand-eye coordination potentially useful in the future as soldiers...

and games allowed children to humiliate the axis...

Children were also used in civil defense. Cadres of civilian volunteers including children, were mobilized to spot for enemy aircraft and ships. Some cadres formed the U.S. Army Aircraft Warning Service...


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